Law Offices of Jan Joseph Bejar A P.L.C.
Resolving Immigration Problems In An Honest & Responsible Manner

Citizenship Archives

Judge grants Muslim man citizenship after USCIS rejected him

San Diego readers might be interested in the immigration victory of a Muslim man. The citizenship and naturalization process can be full of red tape, and one man has experienced that after a lengthy legal battle against immigration authorities. A judge has since ruled that authorities drew the wrong conclusions about the man's faith, and he is now set to become a citizen of this country.

Cuban-born athlete set to participate in Olympics as an American

A 28-year-old athlete from Cuba -- now a U.S. citizen -- truly knows what it means to live the American dream. He remembers dreaming of become an Olympic athlete as a child, practicing swimming alongside his country's national team. Now, the celebrated athlete is gearing up for the upcoming Olympic Games in London after being chosen for one of the two available spots on the American triathlon team at the San Diego trials. This is definitely a success story for the man whose family was targeted by Fidel Castro for being against his policies.

'Prosecutorial discretion' saved California athlete from deportation

A California college athlete attempting to wade through the citizenship and naturalization process had a very close call with immigration authorities recently. The 19-year-old college student is an undocumented immigrant but is a top-ranked athlete at Southwestern College in Chula Vista. The woman had been sitting with her boyfriend at a local park when she was detained by a San Diego police officer. The woman was very nearly deported and is now seeking a way to speed up the citizenship and naturalization process due to her close call.

Alleged abuses tarnish citizenship and naturalization process

In the city of San Diego and throughout the nation, the citizenship and naturalization process is fraught with red tape and stress for those involved. For many immigrants, though, the process is worth it because they want to be in the United States whether for work, family or other reasons. However, recent allegations have tarnished the image of a better life in the U.S. Some have come out claiming alleged abuses by United States Border Patrol agents. Many people who've already been through the citizenship and naturalization process were targeted by the agents, along with those who may have been undocumented.

Asian population undeterred by arduous immigration process

For many immigrants, the citizenship and naturalization process can be confusing and difficult. Those reasons may turn some people off from trying to navigate the lengthy process. However, a new report from the Census Bureau shows that the number of Americans who identified themselves as Asian has surged approximately 46 percent between the years 2000 and 2010. This number far surpasses the 10 percent rate of the United States population growth in its entirety during the same period. While the daunting citizenship and naturalization process may deter some from coming to the United States, the number of Asian Americans in this country has risen more than 17 million during those designated ten years.

Woman denied adjustment of status, may not return to the US

As many California residents may know, the immigration system is often confusing and, at times, even contradictory. Unintentional results may spring from laws designed to address issues very different from what they are intended for. One woman has experienced this firsthand after she applied for an adjustment of status.

Difficulty in obtaining green cards separates families

A change in current immigration law may offer San Diego residents and their families a better chance at obtaining green cards. The current regulations require that those immigrants seeking green cards who apply for a hardship waiver are first required to return to their own country for a consulate interview. Many times, this results in an individual being denied reentry to the U.S. The new change permits applicants for green cards to apply for the hardship waiver in the United States, which can then permit them to stay for an indefinite period of time while awaiting citizenship.

New regulations ease citizenship for undocumented immigrants

Many undocumented immigrants are in hiding because of immigration policy that bars them from re-entry for a minimum of three years if they leave the United States. A proposed change in immigration law would allow any undocumented immigrants to stay in the United States while awaiting a waiver showing that an American citizen would be detrimentally affected by their absence. This change has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of Americans the difficulty of being separated from their spouses or children while awaiting the citizenship process. Proponents of the law believe that it would benefit numerous families by streamlining the process and shortening the length of time that family members are separated.

California Dream Act continues as petitioners fall short

Many immigrants living in California want to become U.S. citizens. However, the path to citizenship can be long and treacherous. Fortunately California has laws to help those who are not yet citizens succeed. Last year, California Governor Jerry Brown signed the California Dream Act into law. The act allows illegal immigrants to be considered for state financial aid toward community colleges and universities across the state. However, the California Dream Act was not backed by all.

Brown signs California Dream Act

While many immigration issues still have a way to go in California, many undocumented students may be getting some good news soon. Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown recently signed into law new legislation that would allow some 41,000 undocumented students financial access to many college programs, including Cal Grants, UC grants and other state-funded scholarships. The bill is known as AB131, and it is the second half of the California Dream Act. While it is not a green card, it will provide a boost to many undocumented students.

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