CORONA VIRUS / COVID-19 ADVISORY

Due to the health risks posed by the Corona Virus tragedy, our office is following the directives of the governor of California in order to minimize the risks to our staff, our clients and our community. Our office will continue to operate fully, as it has thus far, observing our normal schedule, Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. We will continue to schedule appointments to meet with clients and will do this via ZOOM or Telephone only.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with any of our lawyers or staff members, please do so by calling our office at 619-291-1112. You can also contact us via e-mail at [email protected]

Thank you for your understanding.

AVISO DE CORONA VIRUS / COVID-19

Debido a los riesgos para la salud planteados por la tragedia del Virus Corona, nuestra oficina está siguiendo las directivas del gobernador de California para minimizar los riesgos para nuestro personal, nuestros clientes y nuestra comunidad. Nuestra oficina seguirá funcionando a pleno, como lo ha hecho hasta ahora, cumpliendo con nuestro horario habitual, de lunes a viernes de 8:30 a.m. a 5:30 p.m. Continuaremos programando citas para reunirnos con los clientes y lo haremos solo a través de ZOOM o por teléfono.

Si desea programar una cita con alguno de nuestros abogados o miembros del personal, hágalo llamando a nuestra oficina al 619-291-1112. También puede contactarnos por correo electrónico a [email protected]

Gracias por su comprensión.

Resolving Immigration ProblemsIn An Honest & Responsible Manner

Man facing deportation and removal proceedings, newly married

California residents may not be surprised to hear that federal immigration authorities have substantially stepped up deportations in recent years. According to one person, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has deported more people during the three years of the Obama administration than under any other administration that came before. That has meant that some 400,000 undocumented immigrants are being forced to undergo deportation and removal proceedings every year.

One of these undocumented immigrants is a man who came here 16 years ago with his mother as a 6-year-old boy. In January 2010, officials discovered he was living here illegally after they arrested him in connection with an auto theft merely because his fingerprints were found inside a stolen vehicle. However, there was no actual evidence that connected him with that theft, so officials instead charged him with tampering with the car’s rearview mirror.

Today, the man is happily married, and he and his wife are attempting to establish a wholesale bakery. He is also helping to support his three younger brothers, who are citizens because they were born in the United States. Nonetheless, a judge has ordered him to come up with compelling reasons to stay by Jan. 17, 2012. If he cannot do that to the judge’s satisfaction, then he will be deported back to a country where has no family except a father he does not know.

Of the 400,000 people deported each year, 50 percent have no criminal convictions and most of the rest have only minor convictions. Unfortunately, it appears that federal authorities will only continue to step up deportation and removal proceedings. But, undocumented immigrants do still have legal rights, and it may be possible to even prevent deportation where the person poses no risk. For those living in California, it could be beneficial to consult with an immigration attorney, who may be able to help with securing a favorable result.

Source: The Press Democrat, “Petaluma man faces deportation,” Lois Pearlman, Nov. 25, 2011

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