CORONA VIRUS / COVID-19 ADVISORY

Due to the health risks posed by the Corona Virus tragedy, our office is following the directives of the governor of California in order to minimize the risks to our staff, our clients and our community. Our office will continue to operate fully, as it has thus far, observing our normal schedule, Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. We will continue to schedule appointments to meet with clients and will do this via ZOOM or Telephone only.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with any of our lawyers or staff members, please do so by calling our office at 619-291-1112. You can also contact us via e-mail at [email protected]janbejar.com

Thank you for your understanding.

AVISO DE CORONA VIRUS / COVID-19

Debido a los riesgos para la salud planteados por la tragedia del Virus Corona, nuestra oficina está siguiendo las directivas del gobernador de California para minimizar los riesgos para nuestro personal, nuestros clientes y nuestra comunidad. Nuestra oficina seguirá funcionando a pleno, como lo ha hecho hasta ahora, cumpliendo con nuestro horario habitual, de lunes a viernes de 8:30 a.m. a 5:30 p.m. Continuaremos programando citas para reunirnos con los clientes y lo haremos solo a través de ZOOM o por teléfono.

Si desea programar una cita con alguno de nuestros abogados o miembros del personal, hágalo llamando a nuestra oficina al 619-291-1112. También puede contactarnos por correo electrónico a [email protected]

Gracias por su comprensión.

Resolving Immigration ProblemsIn An Honest & Responsible Manner

New immigration law could keep California families together

Some of the saddest stories about immigration involve families forced to separate while they are applying for residency in our country. A new immigration law beginning in March may reduce that likelihood and could give hope to California families affected by the possibility of a separation. The law will minimize the amount of time families are apart while they are applying for residency. As of now, immigrants are required to leave the United States and return to their home countries in order to apply for a green card and await the decision, often resulting in long separation periods and the possibility they may not be able to return.

However, undocumented immigrants will be required to demonstrate why their absence could create a hardship, potentially leaving the door open to be forced to leave pending a decision on an application. The law will allow immigrants currently in this country to apply for a waiver, without the requirement of going back to their own country. However, once they receive their approved application, they are still required to travel back in order to undergo an interview and receive the official approval.

The new law may encourage others who have abandoned the immigration process to try again. In the past, people who have begun the process of permanent residency stopped once they realized there was a very real risk of being forced to go home. The rule may help others feel more confidence in their chances for being allowed to stay.

With the legislation, they may have to go home, but only for a little while. Immigrants have been anxiously awaiting similar legislation. Previously, there was a very real possibility of being banned from returning to this country for up to a decade, depending upon how long they were living without proper documentation here. While there are critics of the new immigration law, it could positively impact undocumented California families and those across the country by allowing them to stay together. Any separation caused after their residency is approved would likely be minimal.

Source: NorthJersey.com, “New U.S. immigration rule designed to help keep families intact,” Monsy Alvarado, Jan. 2, 2013

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