Naturalized citizens living in California or any other state may have their citizenship revoked. Those who were born in the United States may only lose their citizenship if they give it up voluntarily. A naturalized citizen could go through the denaturalization process if he or she is dishonorably discharged from the military. Furthermore, an individual could go through this process after failing to provide testimony related to efforts to potentially overthrow the United States government.

It is important to note that this requirement goes away a decade after a person becomes a naturalized citizen. If it is discovered that a person lied during the naturalization process, he or she may be subject to denaturalization. Individuals are required to be truthful whether they are answering questions on a form or during an interview with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS).

Individuals who lose their citizenship could be subject to deportation, and children who became citizens when their parents did could also be stripped of their status. The process to remove a citizen from the country is considered a civil matter, but the burden of proof that the government is held to is higher than that of a typical civil case. This is because the government acknowledges that citizenship is a special right that shouldn’t be revoked without evidence that a person willfully misrepresented him or herself.

Those who want to learn more about obtaining United States citizenship may want to consult with an attorney. A legal professional might be able to explain the naturalization process and the obligations a person may have while going through it. This person might also help a naturalized citizen obtain a favorable outcome in the event that the government tries to revoke this status for any reason.